Scarlet: Antonio Fernández

A Ballet 5:8 tradition, we are catching up with the dancers for some insights on the creation of Ballet 5:8's full length ballet/film hybrid Scarlet.

Company Artist Antonio Fernández

Q. Tell us about your character. 

 A. I am portraying Auther Dimmesdale, who is a pastor that commits adultery with a married woman named, Hester. Dimmesdale's role in the ballet is to show the danger of keeping sin hidden for too long.

Q. What has been the most fun about learning your character and the choreography? The most challenging?

A. Every part of this process has been so fulfilling and has enriched me as an artist. The choreography has its demand for strong technique but also allows moments to express the character's inner thoughts - making the choreography speak for itself. The challenge is to make sure that I stay true to who Dimmesdale is and how he would react to the circumstance that he is in. In other words, being present at all times.

Scarlet filming | Photo by Eric Seals/Digital Cafe

Q. How does the movement convey your character? The overall story?

A. Dimmesdale is a very important character in Scarlet, so his movement can vary from slow and sorrowful to show the pain he is going through, to strong, explosive jumps/turns to show his frustration and anger. Dimmesdale's movement is vital to the progression of the overall story of Scarlet.

Q. Tell us about your experience during the creation of the film elements. Have you ever been in a movie before?

A. It was a quite the experience to be filmed and so closely. I enjoyed the process of being directed and it also brought a new dimension to Dimmesdale's struggles. I have not been in a movie before but I was in a commercial. 

Q. Why see Scarlet?

A. Scarlet brings Ballet, Film, Spoken Word, and the incredible music by Charles Ives together to show what sin is through the story of Dimmesdale's struggle to speak up regarding the act he has committed with Hester (who is shamed publicly for the same sin). The four artistic components used in production make the story understandable and complete - and will leave audience members in awe of Nathaniel Hawthorne's story.